Want to know the most popular Israeli food? In this post, you will find a list of 10 Popular Israeli Foods.

This is a A Guest Post by Harberdashery*

The food in Israel is delicious and reason enough to move this beautiful country with a rich history to the top of your bucket list. The food in Israel is heavily influenced by and traditionally found in other parts of the Middle East or the Levant region—the area located on the Eastern shore of the Mediterranean.

Local and seasonal ingredients, spices, whole grains, and fruits—especially lemons and dates, plant-based meals—namely eggplant, grilled meats, olives (and olive oil), tahini (sesame seed spread), dairy products (especially white cheeses), tomatoes and chickpea-based dishes like hummus and falafel can be found in abundance. Sweet baked goods and confections made from tahini are also popular. Here’s a list of foods worth a try it you travel to Israel any time soon.

1.   Halva (Halvah, Helva, etc). This sweet, slightly crunchy, flakey confection is formed from crushed sesame seed butter (tahini) or other nut butters blended with sugar, flavor extracts, nuts and sometimes fruit and other spices.

2. Za'atar. A green-colored herb mix that contains salt and sesame seeds. It makes a nice bread dip when added to olive oil or condiment to top on any dish.

3.   Date Syrup. You may have heard Israel referred to as the “land of milk and honey.” Locals say that “honey” refers to date syrup from the many date plantations dotting the Israeli countryside. Date syrup is served with both sweet and savory dishes, and excellent with soft cheeses and yogurt.

4.   Bulgarian Feta. You can’t visit Israel without trying local dairy which is found in abundance. This salty, firm cheese (native to Bulgaria), is like Greek feta but made with sheep’s milk. It is milder and creamier in texture. Try it with olive oil and Za'atar.

5. Labneh. A soft cheese-like Greek yogurt, yet creamier, saltier, and thicker. Treat it like Bulgarian feta and sprinkle it with Za'atar or pour date syrup on top.

6. Hummus. Hummus is usually served as a meal and available on nearly every menu. Israeli hummus is made with a rich 50/50 blend of tahini and chickpea puree enhanced with lemon juice and salt, served with pita and olive oil, chickpeas and spices.

Hummus

Hummus

7. Chocolate krantz cake (also known as babka). A yeasted cake swirled with chocolate—Need I say more? 

Chocolate Krantz Cake

Chocolate Krantz Cake

8. Shawarma. This meat is shaved from a rotating open spit and served on warm flatbread, topped with cabbage salad, tahini and pickles. My favorite shawarma was sliced turkey found in Tel Aviv.

Turkey Shawarma

Turkey Shawarma

9. Falafel- chickpea balls served in soft pillowy pockets of pita accompanied with hummus, tahini, chile sauce, pickles, and thinly-sliced cabbage salad. I loved the falafel at Falafel Ha'zkenim in Haifa.

Falafel with yogurt

Falafel with yogurt

Falafel with Chile Sauce

Falafel with Chile Sauce

10. Shakshuka. This popular breakfast tomato-based dish has baked eggs and spices cooked perfectly for dipping with fresh baked bread.

*Harber-Frankart (also known as Dash) is an avid traveler and the author and owner of harberdashery.com, a blog featuring a collection of ideas about travel and culinary adventures. You can find harberdashey on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram

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