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Geisha Bean in Panama

Geisha Bean in Panama

My grandparents live in Volcan and it is a place I remember growing up a child the beautiful Volcan Baru. I admire it’s nature and tranquility with a variety of fruit trees and plenty of cool air because of it’s altitude. There’s another precious tree hidden in Volcan that produces the world’s most expensive coffee. This type of coffee is a specialty which is called the Geisha and this past weekend I got the opportunity to visit the farm with the 2nd largest product of Geisha in Panama called Janson Farm. This post will focus more on the Geisha specialty coffee.

Leif, the owner, is passionate about coffee and gives daily tours of the farm. My family and I decided to go on the $10 tour which is the most basic with an additional $10 for the coffee tasting which I recommend. There also other tour packages available which you can go on and there is a full listing on the tour website.

Do you know how to distinguish a good coffee bean? I thought maybe it was the color or texture but in fact it’s about the size and the weight. The Geisha is known for it’s fruitiness and the Arabica bean is known for its smoothness and both of these beans are grown at the Janson Farm.

The first machine that we saw on the tour was for washing the coffee. In this process the specialty coffee is separated from the commercial with the machine. The next step is the peeling of the coffee. The Geisha natural bean is not peeled while the Geisha is. Another note is that the Geisha bean is heavier and grows at a higher altitude with colder temperatures. In fact, altitude is one of the most important aspects of the Geisha coffee bean.

Coffee is washed before pre-drying

Coffee is washed before pre-drying

After the coffee is peeled, it is put in the patio for pre-dry it is raked for an hour. This process requires a good amount of sun. Next, the coffee is dried during the shelling process and the coffee is then roasted. The Geisha bean has to be roasted lightly. After the roasting there is a machine which assigns a roast number. The Geisha is hand packed and Leif mentioned that this is one of the key indicators for the aspecialty coffee. Machines are not used to pack the Geisha bean.

Geisha specialty beans pre-drying

Geisha specialty beans pre-drying

Coffee beans are put into bags

Coffee beans are put into bags

The final part of the tour was the sampling of the coffee which I highly recommend. The coffee was presented in a very nice order and presentation. Leif used a pour over method and let me try in order: the Geisha tea, Geisha Natural, hand picked family coffee and regular Geisha. My favorite was the Geisha natural which I found to be subtle. Afterwards, I thanked Leif for a wonderful tour of his coffee farm and purchased different coffee varieties which were sale in the coffee shop.

Find out more about the coffee farm!

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